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Suspension Intervention

IFS for the early Mustang

Jerry Slattery - June 28, 2012 10:00 AM

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For your information:

 

JIM MEYER RACING PRODUCTS, INC.

(541) 994-7717

www.jimmeyerracing,com

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Compare all the parts removed that will be replaced with the new kit. There was a lot of “play” with all that linkage you took off the car.

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Find the template shown in the kit and using the two top holes, bolt it on and drill the two lower holes 3/8-inch each side. These two lower holes actually go through the sheetmetal inner fender panel and bolt to the inner engine-compartment crossmember.

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At the bottom of the tower bracket, there are also two more 3/8-inch holes to drill on each side in the subframe lip. The upper coilover shock bracket and the A-arm can be installed next. The four ½-inch bolts holding the shock bracket is where the adjustable stance adjustment is made. Installing the coilover brackets at the top of the tower will lower the car to the max. After the upper A-arm is installed, it should hit the stock factory rubber bump stop above the new upper A-arm. Jim Meyer is the only manufacturer that offers an adjustable stance IFS or chassis.

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When installing the upper A-arm, place the left/right adjuster to the front.

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After the upper tower holes have been drilled and the tower installed, you can either install the coilovers and the upper A-arms now or after the new crossmember has been installed.

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The new crossmember installs in the stock lower A-arm pocket provided by the Ford factory and uses the same factory bolt holes.

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Place the rack and pinion onto the crossmember. The power rack, as pictured, will mount with two bolts on the driver’s side and three on the passenger side. The manual rack, not pictured, will mount with four bolts, two per side, with the longer bolts on the driver’s side.

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For additional crossmember support, Jim Meyer added forward adjustable support rods that use the stock front strut rod holes. These support rods are up in the frame, unlike the originals that hung down below the suspension. They are below the antisway bar.

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The lower arms can either be installed on the crossmember before you put it in the car or after the crossmember is installed. The shaft is nickel plated and installed in fitted bronze bushings so it will always come out when necessary. Be sure to place a washer between the inside urethane bushing and the crossmember and install the aluminum end caps (four of them) to the ends of the lower A-arm cross shafts.

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The fully installed A-arm system on the crossmember minus brakes will give you a good idea how all the parts go together. Notice the lower coilover shock mount has two positions.

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The four ½-inch holes give you about three inches of stance adjustability and the offset upper coilover bracket can also be flipped for about another inch. This can be done in the driveway at home. We recommend you start your adjustment in the middle.

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On this fully-adjustable IFS, the caster and camber adjustments are all made from the top on the upper A-arm. The upper balljoint will need to be installed; the lower balljoints come pressed in for you. Jim Meyer does offer optional nickel plated A-arms (like the lower arm). At the bottom of the photo, you’ll see where the one-inch diameter antisway bar connects to the lower A-arm.

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Looking into the rear of the driver’s side with the installation complete, you can see how everything is designed to fit in under the Mustang body. The three holes in the subframe on the left held the stock steering box.

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Gloria Pierce bought this ’64½ Mustang and is the only owner. The Jim Meyer bolt-in IFS kit will allow you the stance you like best. The tire/wheel combination features 17x8 wheels with 215/45R17 (front) and 245/45R17 (rear) tires.

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Eliminating the tower suspension to increase handling, stopping and steering performance has been an industry standard for over 20 years.

The new Jim Meyer unit for 1964-’73 Mustangs also fits Cougar ’67-’73, Ranchero ’60-’71, Torino ’68-’71, Cyclone ’64-’71, Montego ’68-’71, Mavrick ’70-’77, Falcon ’60-’70, Fairlane ’60-’70, and Comet ’60-’67 and ’71-’77.

This tower-based platform was never viewed as a great handling package. Take a look at all the parts you need to remove and notice all the connections. There is a little movement in each connection, not to mention the weak tower that needed supports in the engine compartment and under the car to keep it from bending and twisting with torque.

This new unit allows greatly-improved tubular A-arm handling, optional larger disc brake stopping, standard power rack-and-pinionsteering and an additional crossmember to reinforce the stock platform. In addition to reprogrammed suspension geometry, reduced anti-dive and adjustable stance, the new rear steer A-arm independent front suspension offers as standard equipment 11-inch vented disc brakes (with loads of larger disc brake options), aluminum adjustable coilover shocks, one-inch antisway bar, tubular A-arms (not Mustang II) (one-inch by .156-inch wall upper arms and one-inch diameter by .156-inch wall lower-arms).

It features a tighter-than-stock turning radius, caster and camber weight is loaded onto the frame and not the inner fender panel, there’s no need for tower supports, and the rear steer crossmember sits above front-sump oil pans and will clear Patriot headers. The upper A-arms include a left-and-right-hand threaded adjuster for easy alignment.

Probably the best feature is this IFS installation can be done at home in a weekend with basic hand tools and jackstands. There is no cutting and only eight holes to drill with provided templates. A Jim Meyer steering hook-up kit or a new steering column will be necessary to connect to the new R&P steering linkage. Here’s your chance to get that tilt column you’ve always wanted when you install this kit.

After all is removed, be sure to check the frame for straightness or other damage. To start the job, the upper A-arm towers are installed first. All eight holes (four per side) that need to be drilled are all used to attach each upper tower. Let’s go to the photos and see how easy installing independent front suspension can be.

For Your Information

Jim Meyer Racing Products

(541) 994-7717

www.jimmeyerracing.com

 

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