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1965 Shelby

One of few remaining Carryover G.T. 350s

Story Larry Jewett / Images Bill Erdman - January 12, 2012 10:00 AM

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With over 100,000 miles on it, it holds up well thanks to the commitment of restoration.

The legend of the Shelby Mustang has been told time and time again, increasing when the 21st century models started showing up. There isn’t much mystery about the new cars, but this first generation has its share of intrigue.

Take the “carryover” cars, which is a much better sounding term than “leftover”. There were 252 ’66 G.T. 350 cars that were unique in this particular way. According to information from Steve Sloan to this car’s owner Rich Keller, a carryover is a car that started life as a 1965 Mustang and was built into a 1966 G.T. 350. As such, it had a unique blend of features. “The result is a car that has most of the ‘go’ features of 1965 (like lowered front A-frames and over-ride traction bars) with all of the ‘show’ features of the 1966 (like rear quarter windows and side scoops). Or, as some say, both the ‘cooks’ of the ’65s and the ‘looks’ of the ’66.”

Complete details can be found at the website www.carryovergt350.com, but for those who don’t want to turn on the computer, we can give you a little history, again thanks to Sloan. Around the middle of 1965, Shelby realized that Ford would soon shut down Mustang production to retool for the 1966 model year. Some cars would need to be ordered ahead of time to “carry over” Shelby production during that supply cutoff. They also realized they would need some 1966 G.T. 350s ready to sell to the public when Ford introduced the new 1966 Mustang. Shelby ordered 250 1965s to be built into 1966 G.T. 350s. The other two, 6S001 and 6S023, were prototypes (acquired outside the usual ordering process).

Some of the aspects of a carryover include Plain Jane 15-inch rims and the Koni shocks. This car has since gotten the five-spoke Cragar wheels (a Shelby 10-spoke was also found on the ’66 models).

Rich Keller has found that his car has been through quite a bit of transition. It was owned by Jim Ingelese of Weber Induction Systems, and the car served as the test mule for different induction systems. Customers of Weber may actually have purchased parts that were developed on this very car. It also spent some time as a vintage racer.

That was then, this is now. With over 100,000 miles on it, it holds up well thanks to the commitment of restoration. The original Wimbeldon White is gone, but the new coat looks just fine. There were no body modifications added, even during the period when it was in vogue. Stock suspension and the stock 289 Hi-Po and four-speed add to the picture.

There’s no doubt this car can tell some stories, but you get a good one just by looking at it. This is a car that can show you the nuances of the era, yet it’s not like most of the 1966 G.T. 350s you will see.

Some may think “carryover” is a derogatory term (leftover, changeover and crossover are no better), but it adds the appeal and unique character. In the hands of a caring owner like Rich Keller, it will serve beyond its creator’s dreams.

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