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1967 Camaro details

Doing everything right

Larry Weiner - November 17, 2011 10:00 AM

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This reproduction spark plug heat shield set includes the four heat shields, mounting brackets and screws.

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Original spark plug heat shields.

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The location of the bolt that holds the heat shield mounting bracket. Note the bolts are located just beneath the cylinder head on the block. Use a 7/16-inch socket to loosen the bolt.

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The original heat shield and mounting bracket is removed. Removing the ignition wires from the spark plugs will ease the removal and installation of the heat shields.

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A comparison of the original and reproduction heat shields. 

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Install the new heat shield mounting bracket and tighten the attachment bolt in the cylinder block.

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You can attach a new heat shield to mounting bracket using the ¼- inch screw provided in the kit.

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Re-attach the spark plug wires. The new heat shield is installed. 

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These are reproduction radio – ground straps.

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The original right side firewall-to-engine ground strap. It is hanging from the firewall, but not connected to the engine at the valve cover.

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The original firewall-to-frame ground strap is shown. This strap is located at the lower right side of the firewall near the body mount.

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The original firewall-to-frame ground strap is compared with the reproduction. This strap is shorter than the other two and the only one with a serrated eyelet on both ends.

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This shows the correct mounting of right side ground strap. The strap mounts to the firewall using the serrated eyelet end of the strap. It attaches to the engine on the right rear valve cover bolt near the intake manifold, with the open ended terminal sandwiched between the ignition wire stand and the valve cover retainer. The ignition wires and PCV hose have been removed to illustrate the routing of this ground strap.

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This shows the correct mounting for the left side ground strap. This strap mounts to the firewall and attaches to the left rear valve cover bolt closest to the exhaust manifold using the open-ended terminal. The attachment points are per the GM F-Body Assembly Manual.

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Our new firewall-to-frame ground strap is installed.

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The correct reproduction exhaust manifold bolts and flat washers.

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The reproduction French locks.

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The exhaust manifold has the original French locks and incorrect bolts and washers. To remove the bolts, use a 9/16-inch socket.

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The incorrect bolt was too long anyway. This is the appropriate head markings on the reproduction bolt.

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The new bolts, flat washers and French lock are ready to install.

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After installing bolts and French lock, tighten the bolts to 30 lbs-ft using a torque wrench.

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Fold the tabs on French locks using pliers.

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Battery cables are first to get attention. Note the original GM part numbers stamped on the cables.

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The Delco Energizer R59 Battery Topper. It even has a simulated Delco Eye to look just like an original.

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Because of the incorrect terminal placements on the current battery, the negative battery cable body ground wire barely reaches the right fender attachment screw. Remove the original spring ring cables from the battery. Pliers will squeeze the spring ring. Remove the screw retaining the negative cable ground wire to right fender.

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Remove the nut from the water pump stud where the opposite end of the negative battery cable is attached. The old negative battery cable can now be removed from the vehicle.

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Remove the two bolts from the right core and remove the fender brace. Remove the bolt that holds the battery retainer at the base of battery. Take the battery from the vehicle.

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Remove the positive battery cable from the top stud of starter solenoid.

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Install a new positive battery cable eyelet on the starter solenoid. Replace the lock washer and tighten the nut.

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Route positive battery cable through the oil pan clips.

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Four bolts are used to attach the battery tray to the Camaro. There are two located at the front of the tray that screw into bungs on the core support. The other two bolts screw into bungs on the bottom of the tray through the right inner fender. Be sure that the lower bolts do not extend beyond the height of the bungs in the tray. If these bolts are too long, they could puncture the bottom of the battery.

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Connect the positive battery cable charging circuit lead wire (medium brown wire) to the junction block at right side of the core support.

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Install the eyelet of the new negative battery cable on the water pump stud. The serrated washer is installed first, then the negative battery cable eyelet, followed by the nut, per the F-Body Assembly Manual.

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Reinstall the battery into the tray. With the battery in the tray, place the Battery Topper onto the top of the battery. Tighten the bolt on the retaining bracket, followed by connecting the new positive and negative spring ring battery cables to their respective posts.

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Here’s the NOS Delco Remy voltage regulator, part number 119515. This part number was used from1965 thru 1972 on a wide range of GM vehicles, including this 1967 Camaro.

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The part number 1119515 is stamped in the base of the voltage regulator, and is the same as that on the outside of the box. 12V N means 12-volt negative ground. 9F translates to the production date. The number 9 is for the year, in this case, 1969. The second character is the letter F, which translates to the sixth month of the year, June. This is the correct voltage regulator for this Camaro, although the date code that this unit was manufactured does not coincide with the build date of the vehicle.

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Three screws attach the voltage regulator to the well nuts on the core support. The well nuts are manufactured using brass nuts encased in rubber, allowing the voltage regulator to float on the core support. The ground wire seen disconnected attaches to the side of the voltage regulator.

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Here’s a comparison between the Delco Remy voltage regulator on the right and the aftermarket replacement on the left. You can see Delco Remy and Made in USA embossed on the cover. The cover on the replacement regulator is held on with rivets, while the cover of the Delco Remy regulator is attached with screws.

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When attaching the harness plug to the voltage regulator, note the plug only fits one way.

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The completed installation.

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Looking at the broken corner, you can see the screw is barely holding up the side.

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 This is a comparison of the new and reproduction wire harness gutters.

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 The new wire harness gutter is installed.

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First generation Camaros are among the most popular vehicles ever built. These versatile pony cars have been hot rodded, customized and modified in every conceivable way. Incredible success stories in the performance world inspired enthusiasts to build thousands of first gen Camaros into dedicated race cars and wild street cars.

Today, while many first-generation Camaros are still being modified in every way imaginable, they have also become some of the most popular cars to restore. Supporting the virtually limitless interest in these classic vehicles, the automotive aftermarket, often with the blessing of General Motors, has stepped up in a big way. You can find nearly every part necessary to restore or even build a new 1967 through 1969 Camaro from scratch, right down to new replacement steel body shells.

Because of the incredible passion, it’s no surprise that countless first generation Camaros have been restored to better-than-new condition. These cars that command the affection of legions of enthusiasts is proof positive that people from all walks of life love early Camaros.

Among the rarest first-gen Camaros are unrestored originals, ones that have remained stock or nearly so during their entire life, and not subjected to the abuse of hardcore racing or over-the-top mods. In some ways, these are the hardest to find, especially those with numbers matching powertrains and virgin sheetmetal, like our 1967 Camaro RS SS.

This Camaro is a wonderful original, but there’s no denying the effects of the passage of nearly 45 years since it was built at the Los Angeles assembly plant in late 1966. With 95,000 miles on the odometer, it’s obvious that this Camaro has seen its fair share of routine maintenance. As is so often the case, when some of the original factory parts wore out, generic replacement parts were substituted, while some of the original clips and mounting hardware were lost or discarded when the vehicle was serviced.

We’re going to dig deep and take a long, hard look at parts that are missing, incorrect, or just past their prime and in need of replacement. We’ll take the Camaro up a notch by installing both authentic reproduction and NOS parts to replace those that have gone AWOL over the years.

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