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NSRA Southeast Nats (Day 2)

Rods, customs and cars of all eras converge on the fairgrounds again.

Andy Bolig - October 15, 2011 06:34 PM

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At first glance, you could easily overlook this '69 Mustang. Upon closer inspection, you would find an eyeful of late-model parts filling both the interior and engine compartment.

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Believe it or not, this IS a ’34 Ford. Owner Barry Ewing explains that it was built by a friend of his (Oliver Hines) back in 1951! The grille came from a Brewster, a notable American coachbuilder back in the 1930s. Barry hasn’t changed the exterior of the car at all from what his friend crafted back in the 50s but, he did freshen up the car’s paint, interior and wiring, and treated it’s 51 Caddy engine with a 700r4 trans. When “Ollie” built the car in ’51, Barry said it took about 31 different vehicles to complete the car as all of the parts were sourced from a junkyard.

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The ’51 Caddy engine is spotless, and Barry intends to keep it that way- for now. Once he’s done showing the car, he intends on enjoying it. After all, the car was built as a driver back in 1951, why change that now?

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And you thought that stuff came from Tennessee!

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Even though the cars might be much smaller than those in the parking lot, the models section of the show emphasizes the amount of detail that these enthusiasts put into their work. You could say, as much as the full-size ones!

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While not a new trend, a minimalist style of building cars has taken hold of the culture. This Model A was chopped, channeled, Z’d, drilled and treated with a set of trips. The small-block sounded great and while the style might not be for everyone, this car was there for everyone to enjoy. Building a car like this doesn’t necessarily make it easier, it just means you have less parts to get it right with.

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Tim Masters was there with his ’26 T. His club, the Degenerators, come together to build various cars with a traditional style. His T carries out an early “lakes racer” theme in spades and he has a blast driving it. Best of all, he said he’s got about three-grand in the build, showing that you don’t need cubic-dollars to have a great time.

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The cockpit of Tim’s ride is spartan, but does come with a set of goggles and a Necker’s Knob. Check out our Facebook album for more photos of this and other cars.

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It’s important to keep the younger generation interested in cars. Leo Houck and his wife Ginger are doing just that with their grandson, Toby. While the car has been in Leo’s name since 1968, Toby will tell you he’s just letting grampa borrow it. It has a ZZ4/700R4 combo with an 8-inch Ford rear.

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A trip to any show wouldn’t be complete without a stroll around the used parts area. It’s amazing the treasures that you can find if you search through the myriad of boxes at these events. If you needed gaskets, this box contained many of them. There were ignition parts, gaskets and even a set of pistons for a Mercury flathead at this one table.

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...you could hear everything from the lopey lumbering of flatheads to the alcohol-ingesting roar of a SOHC motor...

Things got off to a blazing start on Saturday as cars worked their way through the gates and spectators spun their way through the turnstiles, setting sights on the big day at the Nats.

Friday’s turnout was steady but Saturday’s attendance was definitely increased in traffic, both foot and fueled. Any open areas that were left from the day before were quickly filled in with cars. Even the swap meet area and the car corral increased in size as some new items were put up for sale in hopes of finding a new home. The car corral nearly doubled in size and with the parts area receiving some new tidbits, we were required to make another pass through the aisles to make sure we didn’t miss anything.

The show continued as cars began mulling around the fairgrounds. If you listened, you could hear everything from the lopey lumbering of flatheads to the alcohol-ingesting roar of a SOHC motor in an early T-Bird. Part of the allure of the Nats is seeing the cars in their natural environment- running. The sights and sounds were intoxicating but, if you told the folks in the office that you were “headed for some R&R” you could just as easily find yourself under some temporary shade, sipping your favorite beverage and just soaking it all in, sunshine included. We found ourselves walking the aisles, speaking with enthusiasts about their cars. We got some great photos of some of the cars that were there. Go to our Facebook album featuring the event for more photos.

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