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A Time to Grow

Learn To Work on Cars

Anne Engardio - January 29, 2013 02:13 PM

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Now is the time to take your passion for cars and mold it into something new.
After all, it’s the time of year we look to improve ourselves or start something new, and often make a New Year’s resolution to do so, only to give up on it in a short time.
Ever wonder why some people can keep a New Year’s resolution, and others’ can’t? The key is that the resolution has to be something you have the drive and motivation to do. Something you can see yourself doing. If your resolution is to read more, and you never were an avid reader, it’s going to be a rough ride. If you haven’t given up on it already, you’re probably wondering how you will keep it, or for that matter, start it.
Let’s join that New Year’s resolution with a passion you already have – your car. That way, it will be attainable. There are projects you’ve wanted to do, but have never tackled.
Perhaps you’ve finally retired and are going to start a car restoration project you always wanted to do. Maybe you’ve been laid off and taking the car to the shop for repairs isn’t in the budget right now. Perhaps you’ve always worked under the hood of your car, but never delved into body work, the sound system or upholstery repair and want to tackle something new.
Check out www.iseecars.com for a host of details about vehicles, parts and buying and selling vehicles. This may help you decide what you can do and perhaps what you’d like to do next.
Before starting a project, evaluate your skills. Can you do it with a little guidance from a book or website, or do you need someone to teach you?
There are books, magazines and websites galore on cars, classic cars, hotrods, any kind of vehicle you can imagine, as well as how to fix, repair, or restore cars. There are so many it can be overwhelming and challenging to find a good one.
Before buying a book or reading copious websites, take a look closer to home. Check out your local community college for classes in car repair, and some school district’s adult education programs also offer these classes. In a class you will have someone directing your learning and teaching you the proper steps. If something goes wrong, you’ve got someone right there who can help you figure out what happened, what needs to be done and who can answer questions about your car.
If taking a class doesn’t fit with your schedule, go to the campus bookstore to buy the required and recommended textbooks and read them. If the college only allows registered students to purchase the book, write down the title and author. Most likely you can get it online, ordered through a bookstore, or borrow it from your public library.
It’s a new year; take a look at your wheels in a new way. Take on another project and have fun.

Anne Engardio is a freelance writer who grew up in metro Detroit. One of her first memories is watching cars go by the house with her brothers. Although not a gearhead, she grew up to be somewhat of a car enthusiast, appreciating the beauty, style, design and power of the automobile. After working 20 years as a newspaper reporter, she now resides in Vista, California with her husband Tom.

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