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2011 Daytona Turkey Run

Leftovers in the fridge and enthusiasts in the big oval

Andy Bolig - November 25, 2011 11:02 PM

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These chassis parts for a 29 Model A including the front and rear axle, brake rods and cables, two radiators (one original and one aftermarket) and the complete engine were available for $2500. Someone purchased the frame and body of the donor vehicle (which must have been in VERY good shape, according to what was left over) and didn’t want these parts since they were building a street rod.

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Numerous vendors were offering original or reproduction literature for almost any make or model of auto. We purchased a service manual for our ’32 Chevy two-door sedan and also for a ’52 Chevy pickup.

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Camaros, both big and small

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There was vintage tin to be had. We weren’t sure which was more interesting, this two-door sedan Ford or, the small, four-cylinder powered racer behind it.

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This ’49 Studebaker Champion looked in very nice shape. It was reportedly a California car. A three-speed with overdrive resides directly behind the reportedly rebuilt engine. It was available for $8000 OBO.

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Steel Model T bodies await their next owners alongside flathead heads and various vintage components.

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Charlie Price from Vintage Speed had new parts with that vintage feel for those who want the look, without the work of bringing it back.

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Steele Rubber Products was on hand, along with many other vendors of new, aftermarket items to help enthusiasts put the finishing touches on their favorite rides.

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The parts are only half the story. Complete cars are located inside the car corral or, driven in by attendees of the show. This ’41 Mercury convertible was all original and available for the right price.

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This Mercury was among a group of enthusiasts enjoying the show together. The Turkey Run staff allows for enthusiasts to register as a group, ensuring they can park together and enjoy the show as a unit.

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This Ford F-5 COE flatbed was parked on the show field, it’s heavy hauling days now far behind it.

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This ’53-’55 Corvette sports a nose-high stance with a solid front axle in both front and rear.

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Not all cars at the Turkey Run are modified. This 289-powered ’67 Mustang was very original and was for sale to the right offer.

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One of the best ways to overcome the guilt from gobbling up copious amounts of turkey the day before, on Thanksgiving, is to walk it off amid the acres and acres of parts and cars inside the Daytona International Speedway.

Held at the famous oval since 1989, the Turkey Run is a joint venture between the Daytona Beach Racing and Recreational Facilities District and the Daytona Beach Street Rods. This year, over 3,600 cars pre-registered and there are expected 5,000 cars attending the event over the four days in November. Starting Thanksgiving Day, the event rolls through the weekend with the daylight festivities going on inside the track as the evening’s events sprawl out over the landscape surrounding the local area. Parking lots become impromptu car shows and events ranging from free concerts to competition on the teeter totter fill the nighttime hours with fun for all.
 
Although put on primarily by the Daytona Beach Street Rods club, a broad scope of cars is accepted at the Turkey Run. While there are the prerequisite street rods in attendance, you will also find excellent examples of muscle cars, restorations, classics and customs. No matter whether you’re looking for literature, parts, information or complete cars, the Turkey Run will give you opportunity to swap out a few greenbacks for that item that you just can’t live without. Since the northern portions of the country are beginning to show signs of winter’s grasp, the draw for many to head south contributes to the event’s participation both from vendors and attendees.

Once you walk inside the hallowed high-banked curves, you’re greeted with cars, parts and opportunities to share your enthusiasm with hundreds of thousands of like-minded motorheads. Whether you choose to start by scouring the various boxes and aisles within the vast parts vendor area or, if you choose to look at completed projects, either for sale or show, there’s plenty to see and do. Easily more than a day’s worth of walking. If you’ve never been to a Turkey Run, you owe it to yourself to plan your next trip. Who knows, you could escape some wintry whiteness for sun-bathed fun and, you might even make room for all those leftovers!

Go to our Facebook page for more coverage of the cars at the Turkey Run.

For Your Information:

Daytona Turkey Run

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