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Great Hall Inductions

Bloomington Gold This Weekend

Larry Jewett - June 20, 2012 07:55 AM

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1953 Corvette Serial Number 3

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1956 SR "The Real McCoy"

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CERV I

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1959 Stingray Racer

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1961 Mako Shark

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1967 SURVIVOR

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1967 Corvette Le Mans Racer

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1969 L88 BFG "Stars & Stripes"

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1970 Corvette LT1

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1990 Corvette ZR1

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John Amgwert

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Jerry Burton

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Richard Buxbaum

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John Fitch

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Jerry Kohn

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Kevin Mackay

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Dave McLellan

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Jerome Shinkay

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Corvette Expo

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NCCC

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In 2010, organizers of Bloomington Gold announced a five year plan to honor the 50 people or organizations and 50 cars that played the most significant roles in the Corvette phenomenon. Each year, 10 were selected in each group. This is the third year for the honor and the people and cars have been chosen.
 1953 Corvette Serial Number 3 – E53F001003 was completed on July 1. 1953 in Flint, Michigan, and is the earliest known Corvette. The early production ‘53s were subject to intensive evaluation tests at the Warren, Michigan, test center. This car helped the engineers test the strength and reliability of the “new” plastic body in cold weather and on rough terrain.
 1956 SR “Real McCoy” – “The Real McCoy was one of the earliest slogans used by Chevrolet for their Corvette racing program. John Fitch and Walt Hansgen brought this ’56 racer to a class victory. At Daytona, the car was timed at 157 mph.
 CERV I – An early test vehicle under Zora Arkus-Duntov, CERV stood for “Chevrolet Experimental Research Vehicle.” Meeting or exceeding record speeds at Watkins Glen and Daytona CERV I gave Chevrolet engineers valuable data used in future Corvette Production.
 1959 Stingray Racer – Regarded as one of GM’s most beautiful styling cars, the Stingray Racer started life as a racing concept requested by Design Chief William Mitchell. Dr. Dick Thompson “The Flying Dentist” brought Mr. Mitchell the SCCA National Championship in 1960. Thanks to designer Larry Shinoda, the next generation Corvette was well underway.
 1961 Mako Shark XP-755 – Design Chief Bill Mitchell had his eye on the next generation of Corvette design. Inspired by the shark he caught fishing, the Mako Shark was instrumental in the eventual styling of the iconic 1963 Stingray and is regarded as one of General Motors’ most influential show cars.
 1967 SURVIVOR – Created by David Burroughs in 1989, the SURVIVOR concept re-defined how the world looked at all cars, nit just Corvettes. Originality and authenticity would take center stage and the reward would be a SURVIVOR Certified Corvette. This is the car David purchased to present the concept and answer the question “Why preserve?”
 1967 Corvette Le Mans Racer – Only one 1967 L88 Corvette ever raced in the prestigious le Mans 24-Hour race. Sponsored by Dana Chevrolet and driven by Dick Guldstrand, Bob Bondurant and don Yenko, the L88 ran as high as fourth and led the GT class for 12 hours before retiring. The car also set a class speed record of 172 mph on the Mulsanne Straight.
 1969 L88 BFG Stars & Stripes Racer – BFG made their point by the effective red, white and blue “Stars & Stripes” advertising on this factory L88 Corvette. Driven by John Greenwood and Dick Smothers, #49 won the GT class at Watkins Glen. The racer also set a GT speed record of 215 mph at Le Mans.
 1970 Corvette LT1 – Corvette small block performance is highlighted by the LT1 engine series. This car well represents the last performance V-8 from Chevrolet for nearly two decades. High-revving, solid lifters, and, once again, one horsepower for each cubic inch of displacement, the LT1 made a statement.
 1990 Corvette ZR1 – Under the careful guidance of Chief Corvette Engineer Dave McLellan, the Mercury Marine 32-valve V-8 powerplant was married to the Corvette in 1990. Performance was back at Chevrolet as world speed records were once again set and the title “World Class” entered into the Corvette’s description. The 1990 ZR1 changed the image of Corvette at a breathtaking speed.
John Amgwert – A founding director of the National Corvette Restorer’s Society, John was editor and publisher of The Corvette Restorer, first published in 1974. Amgwert is NCRS member #3.
Jerry Burton – Jerry’s involvement in the corvette phenomenon has many facets. He is the author of many Corvette books, including the biography of Zora Arkus-Duntov. He assisted in the development of the National Corvette Museum and is a former editor of Corvette Quarterly.
Richard Buxbaum – Arguably the first specialty used Corvette dealer to recognize the investment potential of low mileage original cars. Richard’s selective placing of these cars with collectors started the excitement.
John Fitch – A world class Corvette driver, John Fitch drove fast from Sebring, Florida, to Le Mans, France. One highlight of his vast career was the class win at the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1960, driving a Briggs Cunningham-prepared Corvette.
Jerry Kohn – Corvette Central founder Jerry Kohn saw the need for replacement and restoration parts early in our hobby. In addition to the needed parts, Kohn also created effective distribution channels by attending swap meets, advertising and printing comprehensive catalogs.
Kevin Mackay – Kevin set the bar higher for restoration quality through Corvettes coming from his Long Island, New York facility, Corvette Repair, Inc. Restorations included race winners, special body-over-chassis displays and driveable chassis displays.
Dave McLellan – Succeeding Zora Arkus-Duntov as the second Chief Engineer for Corvette, McLellan led the development of the C4 and C5 programs, including the record-setting ZR1 performance package.
Jerome Shinkay – Starting in the mid-1970s, Jerome had the passion, knowledge and foresight to see the desirability and investment potential of ultra-high quality cars, including Corvettes. He set the pace early on for collectors to follow.
Corvette Expo – 1977 was the first year for an exciting new Corvette event, Corvette Expo in Knoxville, Tennessee. Brothers Byron and Ronnie Cooper invited a few thousand of their friends to join them for a swap meet, a car show and an auction. Corvette Expo was one of the first organizations to showcase the Corvette.
NCCC – Created in 1959, the National Council of Corvette Clubs brought the Corvette community together through local clubs, regional events and a national convention. The events included all aspects of ownership. 17,000 members belong to 270 clubs.

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