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Oklahoma Treasure

Hunter’s Corner Auto Sales & Salvage

Leroy Drittler - September 06, 2012 10:00 AM

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About The Yard

The business is open from 8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. on weekdays and usually open from 8:00 a.m. to noon on Saturdays. Occasionally, Durrett will close the yard on Saturday to attend a swap meet or coach a softball game.

The mailing address is Route 4, Box 261, Checotah, OK 74426. Phone numbers are (918) 473-2767 or (877) 442-2767. To get to the yard from Interstate 40 in Oklahoma, take Checotah exit 264, turn north on Highway 69 and go 1 mile to Highway 266. Follow 266 West for 1.9 miles and the business is on the north side of the highway.

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1 Plymouth Barracudas came in three styles in 1967, a fastback, a convertible and notchback. This notchback was just sold and is waiting for the new owner to pick it up.

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2 This 1962 Pontiac Bonneville Sport Coupe is equipped with factory air.

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3 In 1957, Buick stylists incorporated the exhaust outlets in the rear bumper and designed an interesting rear window treatment.

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4 A recent addition to the yard is a ’67 GTO. It is a factory air car and the engine has been removed. Durrett says he is always interested in buying old vehicles and bought this one from an individual that was hauling it to the local crusher.

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5 Both the standard transmission and 292 engine have been removed from this Belmont Blue 1960 Ford Ranch Wagon.

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6 This 1963 Mercury Meteor Custom has S-33 badges on the rear fenders but is lacking the S-33 horizontal chrome bars on the front fenders.

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7 There were only 1,640 Hudson Wasp Hollywoods made in 1955. This one still has its continental spare tire kit.

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8 A huge 1957 Lincoln keeps a small first generation 1967 Camaro off the ground. There were 1,476 Lincoln Capri four-door sedans made during the 1957 model year and 19,776 Camaro Sport Coupes made in 1967.

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9 A 12-cylinder engine with dual carburetors and dual distributors powers this Seagrave fire truck. Seagrave first put a V-12 in its trucks in 1932.

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10 According to Volume X, Number 3 of Automobile Quarterly (Third Quarter, 1972), “Studebaker sold enough vehicles in 1959 to reap a 28.5 million dollar profit.” This ’59 Lark wagon contributed to that effort.

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11 This 1947 Dodge four-door sedan appears to have a decent body. Dodge was the fifth-ranked automaker that year.

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12 The bumper and grille are missing on this 1957 De Soto Firedome, but it has more parts to give.

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13 There were 9,916 Ranchero pickups produced in 1964. Base price was $2,047.

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14 A 1971 Lime Green Chevelle Malibu is missing its original V-8 engine, hood and front bumper plus other parts.

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15 Motor Trend reported in the May, ’61 edition that it had tested the 1961 Falcon and came to the conclusion that “It stands out as a sound, practical machine for most driving needs.” Gas mileage was recorded at 21 to 25 mpg.

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16 Can you remember the last time you saw a 1958 Mercury Commuter four-door hardtop station wagon? This one has the automatic transmission pushbutton keyboard control.

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17 The engine and standard transmission are gone from this 1959 Plymouth Savoy. If you look closely at the trunk lid, you can see the outline of a Sport Fury deck lid tire cover stamping.

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18 This first year 1966 Oldsmobile Toronado Sport Coupe Custom still has its engine, air conditioner and transistor radio. Motor Trend selected it as Car of the Year.

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19 A 1955 Patrician four-door sedan is grouped in the yard with a couple other Packards.

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20 A 1961 Chevrolet Impala Sport Coupe has had its V-8 engine removed, but appears to be a restorable vehicle.

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21 The engine is gone, but this 1969 Chevelle Malibu started life as a factory SS-396 car.

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Benny R. Durrett began Hunter’s Corner Auto Sales and Salvage in 1981 near Checotah, Oklahoma.

He now has about 1,500 vehicles in the salvage yard with somewhere between 300 and 400 of them being antique vehicles. Durrett decided to separate the newer stuff from the old stuff, so he started a private side yard where he keeps the antiques. Parts are for sale only from newer vehicles. Durrett will not sell parts off of any of the older vehicles, but will sell the whole car if it’s something he feels he doesn’t need to keep for future use.

Durrett restores vehicles for himself and the public, usually making the exterior look original, and then uses modern running gear. He says it takes about five parts cars to restore an old vehicle, so he needs several cars for each of his projects. He favors tri-five Chevy cars and 1967-’72 GM trucks and has a lot of those vehicles in the private yard, with none of them for sale.

At one time, Durrett let car lovers tour the private side yard, but had to stop the practice after noticing that some trim parts were disappearing. The private yard has a wide range of antique vehicles ranging from a Crosley wagon to large heavy-duty trucks and everything in between.

Recently, Durrett needed a yard gate and came up with an idea to use the right side skin of a ’58 Chrysler Imperial. The left side of the Imperial had severe damage and was unusable. The gate is in the shop and almost finished and will soon be a real attention getter for the yard.

 

About The Yard

The business is open from 8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. on weekdays and usually open from 8:00 a.m. to noon on Saturdays. Occasionally, Durrett will close the yard on Saturday to attend a swap meet or coach a softball game.

The mailing address is Route 4, Box 261, Checotah, OK 74426. Phone numbers are (918) 473-2767 or (877) 442-2767. To get to the yard from Interstate 40 in Oklahoma, take Checotah exit 264, turn north on Highway 69 and go one mile to Highway 266. Follow 266 West for 1.9 miles and the business is on the north side of the highway.

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