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Horn's Auto Sales & Salvage

50 Years in Business

Leroy Drittler - November 17, 2011 10:00 AM

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The “California” script on this 1967 Buick Skylark California GS is reported as very rare and hard to find. This one has the script on both rear fenders, but the only way to get the script is to buy the complete car.

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There are some parts left on this 1953 Chevrolet Bel Air two-door hardtop with standard transmission.

 

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This 1965 Thunderbird has parts ready for plucking.

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There are a lot of Tri-Five station wagons in the yard, including this 1955 four-door Two-Ten Townsman.

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The latest addition to the yard is a 1954 Oldsmobile Super 88 two-door sedan. It has the power brake option, adding $37 to the original sticker price.

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The engine and transmission have been removed, along with body and trim parts, from this 1951 Studebaker Commander, but there’s still useable parts remaining.

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Before you can get near this 1959 Pontiac Catalina sedan, you’ll need to do some work with a brushing tool to clean out the skin-ripping briars around it.

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A psychedelic paint job comes with this 1961 Corvair 95 panel. Its original color was Flaxen Yellow.

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The least popular 1958 Edsel in the low-end Ranger series was the four-door hardtop, with just over 5,000 sold. The grilles are gone, but a lot of other parts remain.

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The engine and transmission have been removed from this 1964 Ford Galaxie 500 four-door hardtop.

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The briars really need to be cut to get close enough to see what is left on this 1956 Chevrolet four-door station wagon.

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Seldom seen in salvage yards are fender skirts remaining on vehicles such as on this 1955 Oldsmobile 88.

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A 1960 Thunderbird is located in one of the far corners of the yard.

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This 1964 Pontiac Bonneville two-door hardtop is a nice parts car and might even be restorable if the right person got it. 

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This 1956 Chevrolet One-Fifty four-door sedan has a slightly crumpled Bel Air right front fender, but it has other useable parts.

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The oldest car seen in the yard is this 1939 Oldsmobile. It is for sale only as a complete unit. A magazine ad in 1939 touted these cars as “A Honey to Drive!” at a price of $777 and up.

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This 1963 Pontiac Grand Prix is restorable and for sale as a complete car.

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For sale only as a complete car, this 1956 Oldsmobile Holiday four-door hardtop appears to be very restorable.

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This 1967 Chevrolet long wheelbase pickup has a non-original engine under the hood and has a standard transmission. There are several more 1967-’72 Chevy pickups in the yard available for parts removal.

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The original color on this 1958 Chevrolet Biscayne two-door sedan was Silver Blue. It was an automatic, but the transmission and engine have been removed.

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Leroy Horn is a mild-mannered friendly individual who started Horn’s Auto Sales & Salvage at his home in 1961 as a part-time business. In 1975, he decided to make it his full-time job. Horn lightheartedly recalls that it seems he made more money working it as a part-time business.

4 There are a lot of Tri-Five station wagons in the yard, including this 1955 four-door Two-Ten Townsman. 5 The latest addition to the yard is a 1954 Oldsmobile Super 88 two-door sedan. It has the power brake option, adding $37 to the original sticker price. 6 The engine and transmission have been removed, along with body and trim parts, from this 1951 Studebaker Commander, but there’s still useable parts remaining. 7 Before you can get near this 1959 Pontiac Catalina sedan, you’ll need to do some work with a brushing tool to clean out the skin-ripping briars around it. 8 A psychedelic paint job comes with this 1961 Corvair 95 panel. Its original color was Flaxen Yellow.

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