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Finding Vintage Parts

Always Auto is a Place to Start

Joe Sharretts - May 09, 2013 10:00 AM

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This ’66 T-bird has already given a lot of parts up including its roof. It still has a lot to offer, but better get parts soon as the weather can take a toll on the inside.

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Finding a nice ’61 Impala for parts is getting hard these days. Fortunately for us, Always has a nice one ready to go.

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Body parts on this ’64 Mercury aren’t exactly in the best shape, but someone may be able to use them. In addition, interior and motor parts seem to be usable and available.

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To anyone working on a 1970 Tempest, you should consider visiting this one as it may contain a lot of the parts you need.

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This 1968 Newport was once for sale as a running car for only $1,900. Now, you can stop by and pull some extra choice parts off of it.

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Mid-’70s Cadillacs are becoming very popular these days. This 1975 would be worth checking out as even the ’70s cars are drying up fast in salvage yards.

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The beach air is not very kind to the metal parts of cars as shown on this ’69 Oldsmobile.  Usually, mechanical and interior parts do just fine in these conditions.

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Former restoration cars turned salvage yard cars are always the best source of parts.  In this condition, the parts on this ’64 Corvair obviously won’t last here long.

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At one point, these late-’60s Darts were all over the salvage yard scene and many were still on the road. Even these are not an everyday salvage find anymore.

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We feel that this ’69 Ford would make an excellent donor car as most of the parts remain in decent shape.

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Currently, the oldest car in the Always inventory is this ’48 Chrysler Windsor. It is near complete and very restorable.

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This ’68 Javelin has already given up its wheels and some of the glass. These are not an everyday find in a salvage yard. Here’s an opportunity to stock up on these quality parts now.

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The only thing keeping this ’73 Nova here is the trunk lid.  Once that is gone, the car will probably be crushed.

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Even if you don’t own a ’64 Buick, you need to remember that many of the parts interchange with other years, as well as other GM models.

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This photo shows a whole row of what we call future GM classics. All of these cars fall in the late '70s and early '80s range.

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Mustang IIs of any year have a very small survival rate. Here is a complete 1975 model. If you have one, you should definitely grab a few spares off of this one.

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Other than missing the four wheels, we can see absolutely nothing wrong wtih this 1973 Satellite.

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Here is a very rare and unusual station wagon that definitely needs to be saved. This 1960 Buick Invicta wagon still has the 401 under the hood and is a very restorable piece.

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What makes this ’56 Chrysler unusual is the fact that it was originally pink. Unfortunately, since the whole front was torched off, restoration is out of the question. It is still a great car for parts.

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Hopefully, the parts off this ’55 Oldsmobile will go to good use in putting another ’55 back on the road. All 1955 GM cars seem to be pretty popular. 18 Here is a very rare and unusual station wagon that definitely needs to be saved. This 1960 Buick Invicta wagon still has the 401 under the hood and is a very restorable piece.

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As of five years ago, the eastern shore of Virginia was a place where vintage parts for cars were in every yard. That has all changed and those parts are becoming rare.

15 This photo shows a whole row of what we call future GM classics. All of these cars fall in the late ’70s and early ’80s range. 16 Mustang IIs of any year have a very small survival rate. Here is a complete 1975 model. If you have one, you should definitely grab a few spares off of this one. 17 Other than missing the four wheels, we can see absolutely nothing wrong with this 1973 Satellite.

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